Category Archives: Education

[gdlr_dropcap type=”circle” color=”#ffffff” background=”#cd853f”]M[/gdlr_dropcap]ay Day is a public holiday usually celebrated on May 1st. It is an ancient festival of Spring and a current traditional spring holiday in many cultures. Dances, singing, and cake are usually part of the festivities. May baskets are made. These are small baskets usually filled with flowers or treats and left at someone’s doorstep. The giver rings the bell and runs away.  Sherwood Forest Friends originally planned a field trip to the North Carolina Arboretum to celebrate this spring, with cake , but in light of coronavirus precautions, we will celebrate May Day 2020 virtually! The Arboretum was established as an affiliate of the University of North Carolina System by the State General Assembly in 1986, nearly a century after Frederick law Olmsted, the Father of American Landscape Architecture, first envisioned a research arboretum as part of his legacy and plan for George Vanderbilt at Biltmore Estate. Join us for a…

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By all accounts our first program of 2020 was a huge success. From 4:30 to 6:00pm on February 6, folks gathered at The Cove to learn about our winter birds and how to take care of them. The program began with a presentation from our resident “birder cum laude”, Susan Goldsworthy, on recognizing and feeding our winter feathered friends. Following Susan, Cathy Nell gave an update on Sherwood Forest’s application for Audubon certification of the gold course. As many of us know, the open grassland of the gold course presents a very different bird habitat that attracts different species than our forest. The last presentation was a hands-on demonstration on how to make tasty bird “suet” using peanut butter. Yum! As per forest tradition, refreshments were served. The “Hummingbird cake” was a huge hit (no hummingbirds were harmed.) If you have Powerpoint, you can watch the presentations from Susan and…

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Please join us for these great events!    

On October 23, twenty-five “friends” headed out for a day of Cherokee culture. We met Lianna Costantino, our guide for the day, in Sylva. Our first stop was the Judaculla Rock in Jackson County. This ancient soapstone rock is covered with drawings thought to predate modern Cherokee culture. While Lianna told us the story behind the legend of Juthcullah we all pondered what the drawings actually mean. Some thought they were a recording of history while a few thought the rock could be a map.   Our next stop was the pavilion at Mark Watson park where we enjoyed a deeeelishous picnic lunch prepared by Cathy Nell and Kathy Figiel. Everything was prepared and packaged with love!               On our short drive to the Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Lianna told us stories of the Cherokee and explained their language. In the museum she…

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By all accounts, the 2018 Summer Series of programs was a success. The series of four lectures focused on an environmental theme. Beginning with the original environmentalists of our area, the Cherokee, we traveled through the the environmental movement of the mid-twentieth century and into the the future as Dr. Suresh Muthukrishnan, Ph.D explained how graphic mapping of global data can show us things we might not have noticed. Lianna Elizabeta Costantino sat in front of a campfire and told us Cherokee stories that gave us rich insight into their culture and relationship to mother earth. The following week, Caroline McIntyre brought Rachel Carson to life in dramatic fashion as she explained the social climate of the 60’s and her battle against chemical pollution. A simple but evocative interior set on the stage gave a warm, encompassing feeling to the evening. Jim Stokely, whose mother Wilma Dyckeman, is credited with…

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The 2018 Summer Series is less than a week away and bound to provide stimulating discussion. Don’t miss any of it! 7:00pm, August 17 One With the Earth: Cherokee and the Environment Before Europeans came to this continent indigenous peoples lived off the land. The Cherokee of the Appalachians were the original environmentalists. They lived with the land. Join Lianna Elizabeta Costantino as she tells us about Cherokee ideas regarding health, well-being and healing, medicine and forestry. 7:00pm, August 23 Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring In the summer of 1962, Silent Spring was published and raised America’s awareness to the future of the planet and all life on Earth. She called for humans to act responsibly as stewards of the living earth. Her book became the drumbeat for a generation of environmentalists. Step into the past as Caroline McIntyre recreates Carson and discusses the monumental work. 7:00pm, August 30 Wilma Dykeman,…

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